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Knocking A Cricket Bat

Knocking A Cricket Bat

Knocking a cricket bat is an essential process of preparing a bat to deliver better timing to your shots. While people mostly buy pre-knocked in bats, further knocking is recommended and hence it is essential to know the process. Knocking in can take anywhere between 4 to 6 hours depending upon the softness of your willow.

Oiling:
Before knocking process, oiling process should be done. This is done to prevent the wood from drying out. Oiling process make the bat soften. Raw Linseed Oil should be used to become the bat brittle. It is requires the bat should be oiled with raw linseed oil which makes the bat brittle. It is suggested that oil should be applied 3 to 4 times before the process of knocking begins. Ensure that the edges are also oiled. Spread the oil over the face of the bat using a small rag or your fingers. A full coat of oil should be apply in front, back and toe with less than one teaspoon full. Avoid oiling the splice of the bat which is the very top section of the blade. During the drying time the bat should be laid horizontally, and out of direct sunlight. After leaving it at least overnight repeat the procedure again but this time use even less oil than the first time. In other words give it only a very light rub with the same open weave cloth from before. Leave lying horizontally for at least 6 hours. After this oiling you are then ready to begin the Knocking In procedure.

Knocking:

Knocking process should be done using a Hardwood bat mallet hit the face of the blade of the bat repeatedly for several hours.  This process provides good performance than a ball mallet and also help in to increase the speed. Start by hitting the middle of the bat just hard enough to create a dent. During this process make sure that you are knocking every region of the blade and ensure that no stickers should be there while knocking and should be equally and concurrently knocked. Don’t knock-in the back of the cricket bat. The edges of blade should be rolled with the angle of 90 degrees. This process should  be repeated, however each time it increases the pressure. When knocking in process has been completed, you have to check whether more oil should be applied or not. When you have finished he first 2-3 hours, you can proceed to use the bat for out field practice and then in the nets against an old used high quality cricket ball.